Educate-Definition-1920x500

Trending-Self-Esteem-500 x 385Self Esteem- Identifying you!
ELEMENTARY – Navigating to find themselves

What you can do:
Support Activities that your child enjoys
Explore and identify interest that your child has
Nurture qualities in your child by engaging in activities together.
If your child likes to recycle, help others, make it important to you, maybe volunteer together, or assign your child to be the house helper to help develop leadership skills.
Be careful on how much criticizing than praising your child receives from parents, teachers and coaches.

Conversation Questionnaire:
Get to know your child by asking them to fill in the blanks. Do this activity together, and help your child get to know you.
What are 4 words that describe you_______,_____________,________,______________.
I love to_________
I feel sometimes______________________.
I find happiness in_________________.
I need_____to feel safe.
I fear_____________at times.
I enjoy to_____________.
I like to__________
I want to be ___________someday.
What self esteem looks like?
Being happy
Encouraging others
Believing in themselves
Has an “I can do it attitude”
Respects others
Easily adapted to new environments.

Junior High: Social Status- Forced to fit in.
What does Self esteem look like?
Confidence, without arrogance
They appreciate their own worth, and take pride in theirabilities, skills, and accomplishments.
Decision makers
Have an “I can do it attitude”.
Doesn’t have a victim attitude or degrades others.
Doesn’t waiver on beliefs.
What you can do?
Get to know the influencers in your child life.
Be available to talk with your child and understanding their
“talk” language….
.
Help teach skills. Not only is it important to encourage teenagers in the areas that they have interest, but it is also necessary to teach them real skills. The straightforward teaching of skills to adolescents often results in increased achievement and, thus, in enhanced self-esteem. In other words, the more skills a teenager acquires (how to cook, change the oil, fix something broken, or build something),the better he will feel about himself.

Help identify areas of interest. Every teenager has a particular area of interest or areas where they excel. Whether it is in athletics, music, school, art, or ministry, help your teen to identify his area of competence, and support it.
Provide Praise and Encouragement. It is vital that teenagers receive praise and encouragement from parents or other influential adults. As human beings, since we are naturally good at recognizing mistakes, we must be intentional to point out the positives we notice our children doing. Take a few minutes before bedtime and point out several positive things your teen did throughout the day. It doesn’t matter how trivial the positive behavior was, let him know that you noticed his effort.

Conversation Questionnaire:
Get to know your child by asking them to fill in the blanks. Do this activity together, and help your child get to know you.
What words do you think your friends would you to describe you?
What qualities do you like about yourself list 3___________.
Do you consider yourself a good friend? Why?
Everyone has something they would like to change about themselves, what would yours  be?
What is something you fear?
How do you enjoy spending your time?
When you look in the mirror do you like what you see?
Do you think it is important to have a lot of friends or just “key” friends?
Do your friends accept the choices you make?
Do you feel different about yourself if you have a blemish on your face?
Are you hard on yourself when you make a mistake?

High School- Crossing over
This is the time where independence starts surfacing in teens. They see the power in taking ownership in their choices in what they do how they spend their time and more importantly who with.
What does self esteem look like:
Leader not a follower
Expresses opinions, works cooperatively in a group, initiates friendly contact with others, and maintains eye contact during conversation.
They appreciate their own worth, and take pride in theirabilities, skills, and accomplishments.
Decision makers
Have an “I can do it attitude”.
Doesn’t have a victim attitude or degrades others.
Goal orientated
What you can do?
Help teach skills. Not only is it important to encourage teenagers in the areas that they have interest, but it is also necessary to teach them real skills. The straightforward teaching of skills to adolescents often results in increased achievement and, thus, in enhanced self-esteem. In other words, the more skills a teenager acquires (how to cook, change the oil, fix something broken, or build something), the better he will feel about himself.
Help identify areas of interest. Every teenager has a particular area of interest or areas where they excel. Whether it is in athletics, music, school, art, or ministry, help your teen to identify his area of competence
Provide Praise and Encouragement.
It is vital that teenagers receive praise and encouragement from parents or other influential adults.

As human beings, since we are naturally good at recognizing mistakes, we must be intentional to point out the positives we notice our children doing. Take a few minutes before bedtime and point out several positive things your teen did throughout the day. It doesn’t matter how trivial the positive behavior was, let him know that you noticed his effort.

Conversation Questionnaire
What do you believe are your strongest characterizes?
What are your weakest ones?
How would you feel if you didn’t make the team that you were trying out for?
How do you think you will want to earn a living doing one day?
What do you fear?
What qualities do you look for in a friend?
Are you hard on yourself when you make a mistake?
What words do you think your friends would use to describe you?